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Collaborations



N*Grid, Cactus, UCoMS, GriPhyN, Condor, The Grid Infrastructure, Geon, EPhysics Portal, CLUSTERIX, CASPer, GridOneD, GEO 600, Einstein@home, VL-E, GriKS, NRL Protean Group, GEMSS, Ibis, and more...

N*Grid project [GridLab technologies: GAT, Cactus, Gridsphere, GridLab Services]
The N*Grid is a government funded project to build a Grid infrastructure across S. Korea, Grid middleware, and to enhance applications to make use of these Grid technologies. Like GridLab, N*Grid is aimed at supporting real applications on a production Grid. As part of this effort, N*Grid is interested in working with GridLab and the Cactus Project to enhance the Cactus Computational Toolkit to support Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) applications. In addition, N*Grid Project is interested in using GridSphere, developed by the Portals work package, to support development of the N*Grid Portal. Thus, this collaboration will provide GridLab with many opportunities for exploring the use of all of its technologies in a whole new range of application scenarios.

For more information: http://gridcenter.or.kr/

Cactus Computational Toolkit [GridLab technologies: GAT, Gridsphere, GridLab Services]
The Cactus Computational Toolkit is an open source problem solving environment that originated in the academic research community. It was initially designed for computational scientists working with Einsteins equasions in the field of numerical relativity. It has since evolved to provide a general parallel programming framework with which researchers from many different disciplines can easily create reusable modules, with well defined interfaces, to construct powerful and complex problem solving codes and environments. Gridlab is working very closely with developers of Cactus to construct tools and services that will provide computational scientists with an easy-to-use and stable Grid platform on which they can build and execute their application codes. The Cactus Portal is one of the most visible software components being developed to support the Cactus project in these efforts.

For more information: http://www.cactuscode.org
and http://www.cactuscode.org/Collaborations/index.html

UCoMS: Ubiquitous Computing and Monitoring System for Discovery and Management of Energy Resources
[GridLab technologies: GAT, Gridsphere, GridLab Services]
UCoMS is a new project in the Center for Computation and Technology at the Louisiana State University in the USA to develop new Grid computing and sensor network technologies for the management of energy resources. The overall research objective lies in the design, deployment, and evaluation of a large-scale ubiquitous computing and monitoring system for exploration and management of energy resources in the Gulf of Mexico. UCoMS is designed to support computation-intensive fine-grained simulations, enable a huge amount of measured data storage and real-time processing, and provide safety monitoring on the well platforms. These design goals will be achieved by means of massive computing power made available through grid computing for demanding reservoir simulation runs and huge drilling/production data storage and processing. The GridLab Grid Appliacation Toolkit will be expanded to support UCoMS applications, with user interfaces and grid portals built and deployed on the basis of the GridSphere framework.

For more information: http://www.cct.lsu.edu/projects/ucoms/index.html


Astrophysics Simulation Collaboratory [GridLab technologies: GAT, Cactus, Gridsphere, GridLab Services]
The ASC provides the collaborative environment for numerous geographically distributed projects in different scientific disciplines. It accomplishes this through the ASC Portal, a specialized framework for the Cactus Computational Toolkit, that ties astrophysics and grid computing together. The ASC portal manages the various aspects of a Cactus simulation (building a configuration, launching a simulation) and also enables the visualization of output data. The collaborative aspects of the portal derive their power from the communication (XML/SOAP) between the Cactus code and the ASC portal. Users can launch jobs on remote resources that announce their existence to the portal, display their resource hostname, data storage directory, current time-step, and the port number of a web server that provides additional simulation information. Group members can subsequently follow the job's progress and view job details by means of this web server.

For more information: http://wugrav.wustl.edu:8080/gridsphere/gridsphere

GriPhyN project [GridLab technologies: GridLab Services]
The GriPhyN (Grid Physics Network) project brings together an outstanding team of information technology (IT) researchers and experimental physicists to provide the IT advances required to enable Petabyte-scale data intensive science in the 21st century. Driving the project are unprecedented requirements for geographically dispersed extraction of complex scientific information from very large collections of measured data. To meet these requirements, which arise initially from the four physics experiments involved in this project but will also be fundamental to science and commerce in the 21st century, the GriPhyN team will pursue IT advances centered on the creation of Petascale Virtual Data Grids (PVDG) that meet the data-intensive computational needs of a diverse community of thousands of scientists spread across the globe.

For more information: http://www.griphyn.org

Condor project [GridLab technologies: GridLab Services]
The goal of the Condor Project is to develop, implement, deploy, and evaluate mechanisms and policies that support High Throughput Computing (HTC) on large collections of distributively owned computing resources. Guided by both the technological and sociological challenges of such a computing environment, the Condor Team has been building software tools that enable scientists and engineers to increase their computing throughput.

For more information: http://www.condorproject.org

The Grid Infrastructure Project [GridLab technologies: Gridsphere, GridLab Services]
The Grid Infrastructure Project is a three-year (2002 - 2005) project involving, in conjunction with the Multi-Scale Modeling Project, several Canadian National Research Council (NRC) institutes in the development of scientific applications and middleware for smoothly and effectively executing applications on the Grid. The Grid project is a collaborative effort between the Research Computing Support Group of IMSB and the High Performance Computing Group of IIT. Grid technologies are also used at NRC to provide controlled remote access to Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy instruments located at several sites. The Research Computing Support Group at NRC is developing a comprehensive software product that provides access to the NMR resources: the SpectroGrid Portal.

For more information: http://www.grid.nrc.ca

Geon: Cyberinfrastructure for the GeoSciences [GridLab technologies: Gridsphere]
The GEON (GEOscience Network) research project is responding to the pressing need in the geosciences to interlink and share multidisciplinary data sets to understand the complex dynamics of Earth systems. To rise to this challenge, we have formed a coalition of IT researchers, representing key technology areas, and Earth Science researchers, representing a broad cross-section of Earth Science sub-disciplines. The need to manage the vast amounts of Earth science data was recognized through NSF-sponsored meetings, which gave birth to the Geoinformatics initiative. The creation of GEON will provide the critical initial infrastructure necessary to facilitate Geoinformatics and other research initiatives, such as EarthScope.

For more information: http://www.geongrid.org

EPhysics Portal Development at the University of Melbourne [GridLab technologies: [Gridsphere]
Theoretical astrophysics and experimental particle physics are major clients of high performance computing (HPC) facilities worldwide. They are key application drivers for grid technology and distributed computing paradigms and the codes are typically numerically intensive, and must process, access, or generate massive data sets. Virtual observatories (VOs) are one of the leading applications and early adopters of compute and data grid technology. They deliver a new paradigm for doing experimental astronomy, and in particular offer exciting possibilities for completely integrating observational astronomy and theoretical astrophysics. Experimental particle physics data analysis is a key application of grids. The Belle Analysis Data Grid project is developing a global data grid to access and process terabytes of data from the KEK B-meson factory in Japan, searching for the violation of a fundamental symmetry known as Charge-Parity, or CP, violation. The ePhysics program at the University of Melbourne has a number of general and specific goals.

For more information: http://www.aus-vo.org

CLUSTERIX - National CLUSTER of LInuX Systems [GridLab technologies: Gridsphere, GAT, GridLab Services]
The main objective of the project is to develop mechanisms and tools that allow the deployment of a production-class Grid environment metacluster consisting of local PC-clusters located in geographically distant independent centers. The backbone installation will consist of local PC-clusters with 64-bit architecture connected by dedicated channels based on the PIONIER optical network. The particular aims include, among others, the development of a management software (middleware) allowing access to the resources and their control, support for dynamic changes in size and configuration of the hardware architecture, including temporary addition of computational resources, therefore allowing the overall power increase without the necessity to dedicate a machine pool for the grid, as well as collaboration with other projects related to the PIONIER program, e.g., remote visualization, access to data warehouse and KKO (National Computational Cluster based on the LSF batch system).

For more information: http://www.clusterix.pcz.pl

CASPer project [GridLab technologies: Gridsphere]
Numerical simulation methods have improved and matured along the last forty years, and improved approaches have allowed for the simulation of more and more complex phenomenons. Alongside the evolution of the methods used, the growth of computing power has led to more and more precise simulations. It is now possible to accurately predict the behavior of a product in the early stages of its conception, thus shortening production cycles, as well as reducing the need for physical prototypes. There are still two major reasons why numerical simulation is not fully adopted :
  • Small and medium enterprises face a heavy entry cost to acquire the computational means (hardware, software licenses, and the personnel to manage them), and the return on investment on such infrastructure is usually very slow.
  • On the other hand, bigger companies can not always fully exploit the simulation infrastructure they deployed. Once the computational means are in place they may not always be flexible enough for the people to fully exploit and share the results of the simulations. It is also hard to occasionally run more complex simulations than those the infrastructure is designed to scale for.


For more information: http://casperlabs.sourceforge.net

GridOneD project [GridLab technologies: GAT, Triana, GridLab Services]
GridOneD is based around the Triana software and is focused on creating open source middleware components for use within Triana and other applications wishing to become grid enabled. GridOneD also extends Triana to supply services for integrating Gravitational Wave search codes. It is using the GAP/GAT and various Gridlab services to implement a production scenario for Grid computing for searching for inspiral binaries and for data mining applications. For example, it is using the following Gridlab services: data management for replication and the transferring of the gravitational wave data; GRMS for submitting a Triana job onto the testbed; monitoring for asynchronous monitoring of notifications of parameter changes; GridSphere for rendering the current list of Triana jobs submitted onto the testbed; and the adaptive components to automatically load balance the services for a specified QoS.

For more information: http://www.gridoned.org

GEO 600 project [GridLab technologies: [Triana, GAT]
GEO 600 is the main customer for GridOneD. The GEO 600 project aims at the direct detection of gravitational waves by means of a laser interferometer of 600 m armlength. Gravitational waves are extremely small ripples in the structure of spacetime caused by astrophysical events like supernovae or coalescing binaries.

For more information: http://www.geo600.uni-hannover.de

Einstein@home project [GridLab technologies: Triana, GAT, GridLab Services]
Phase II of the Einstein@home project will be coordinated by the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics in Golm and Cardiff University to scale peer-to-peer distributed computing projects (such as SETI and BOINC) to millions of peers. The Einstein@home proposal, phase |, has been submitted to the NSF in February 2004, proposal number NSF-0427768. Phase II will use a BOINC binding of the GAT interface combined with services from other projects, such as FreeNet, in order to reach the scalability, remain future-proof and allow applications to use this environment along with any other that the GAT supports.

For more information: http://www.lsc-group.phys.uwm.edu/itr2004/

VL-E project [GridLab technologies: GAT, GridLab Services]
The mission of the VL-E project is to boost e-Science by the creation of an e-Science environment and doing research on methodologies. The strategy is to carry out concerted research along the complete e-Science technology chain, ranging from applications to networking, focused on new methodologies and reusable components. The essential components of the total e-Science technology chain are:
  • e-Science development areas,
  • a Virtual Laboratory development area,
  • a Large Scale Distributed computing development area, consisting of high performance networking and grid parts.


For more information: http://www.vl-e.nl/

GriKSL Grid Based Simulation and Visualization [GridLab technologies: GAT, GridLab Services]
This projects develops new technologies to support computing intensive applications. It builds on the results of the predecessor project TIKSL and concentrates on three main areas, which are important for the future development of Grid technologies, i.e. technologies that utilize geographically distributed computing ressources: grid-awareness of existing applications, description and handling of large scale distributed data sets and tools for remote and distributed data visualization. Further information is available in the detailed project description. GriKSL, the German DFN project, used parts of GridLab software, e.g. remote file access and visualization.

For more information: http://www.griksl.org/

NRL Protean Group: SRSS Project [GridLab technologies: Triana, GAT, GridLab Services]
The key focus for the Scalable, Robust Self-Organizing Sensor (SRSS) systems project in NRL is to investigate and model, using network simulation tools, lightweight network application discovery mechanisms suitable for application in mobile sensor systems. The SRSS systems in question are envisioned to leverage self-organizing computer communication networks based on Mobile Ad-hoc Networking (MANET) routing protocols which operate using wireless communication links and have no centralized administration or control. It is paramount to the SRSS project that they construct a reusable architecture for testing out various discovery mechanisms employed by different middleware infrastructures. The group therefore have chosen the GAP interface from Gridlab, which provides access to core set of P2P services e.g. advertising, discovery, and synchronous and asynchronous communication. The current binding used for prototyping uses the GAP P2PS binding.

For more information: http://tang.itd.nrl.navy.mil/5522

GEMSS project [GridLab technologies: Triana, GAT, GridLab Services]
The European GEMSS Project is concerned with the creation of medical Grid service prototypes and their evaluation in a secure service-oriented infrastructure for distributed on demand/supercomputing. Key aspects of the GEMSS Grid middleware include negotiable QoS support for time-critical service provision, flexible support for business models, and security at all levels in order to ensure privacy of patient data as well as compliance to EU law. The medical prototype applications include maxillo-facial surgery simulation, neuro-surgery support, radio-surgery planning, inhaled drug-delivery simulation, cardio-vascular simulation and advanced image reconstruction. At the core of these biomedical simulation applications are computationally demanding methods such as parallel Finite Element Modelling, parallel Computational Fluid Dynamics and parallel Monte Carlo simulation.

For more information: http://www.ccrl-nece.de/gemss/

Ibis: Efficient Java-based Grid Computing [GridLab technologies: GAT, GridLab Services]
The goal of the Ibis project at the Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam is to design and implement an efficient and flexible Java-based programming environment for Grid computing, in particular for distributed supercomputing applications. Java has many advantages for Grid computing. Foremost, by being based on a virtual machine concept, it is inherently more portable than traditional, statically compiled languages, making it much easier to execute Java applications in a heterogeneous Grid environment. Also, Java is based on a high-level, object-oriented, type-safe programming model and it has built-in support for multithreading and distributed computing.

For more information: http://www.cs.vu.nl/ibis/



GridLab: Grid Application Toolkit and Testbed is co-funded by the European Commission under the Fifth Framework Programme (IST-2001-32133).
Web admin: Petr Holub, web design: Radoslaw Strugalski

Last update on Tuesday, 29-Mar-2005 19:07:51 CEST.